Yesteryears

1920 — 100 years ago

Mr. Barmettler has been at work for several days preparing the foundations for the new bowling alleys in the basement of the Highway Auto Garage. “The solid cement floor will provide the ideal foundation for the drives, making it certain that the alleys can be laid perfectly level and have them stay so,” he said. “In addition, the height of the ceiling and the window arrangement will allow of ideal ventilation so that the heavy smoke-laden air and general steaminess usually found in such places will be entirely absent.” — Hood River News

While other counties are bewailing the shortage of school teachers, Wasco County schools are amply supplied and running smoothly, simply because of the willingness on the part of the county to pay teachers a living wage, according to A. E. Gronewald, county superintendent of schools. The average wage of teachers in Wasco County is around $115 a month, according to Gronewald. — The Dalles Chronicle

 

1940 — 80 years ago

HISTORY 1940 Leslie Butler is 90 HRN.jpg

Another happy birthday has come to Leslie Butler, veteran of the Mid-Columbia area, who can now rightfully boast that he is 94 years young. Alert in mind and physically fit, Leslie Butler is the shining example of a man who consistently refuses to admit that the burden of years is any burden at all. Leslie Butler is being congratulated by a host of friends, from far and near, and the News’ staff feels privileged to be among them. — Nov. 15, 1940, Hood River News

 

Although Armistice Day signaled the arrival of winter, with snow and a chill east wind this year, Legionnaires seized the opportunity to celebrate — for the United States is the only nation which participated in the World War in which the day was formally observed. Armistice mornings, veterans met at the Apple Blossom Café and at 11 a.m., following the Armistice signal, observed their rituals on the lawn of the old court house. — Hood River News

When residents of The Dalles awoke on the morning of this Armistice day, 1940, they found — much to their amazement — nearly an inch of snow covering the ground and temperatures at the freezing point. Consequently, today winter overcoats were much in evidence on city streets and motorists who had neglected to stock their cars with anty-freeze (sic) were “hitting” for the nearest garage or service station. — The Dalles Chronicle

 

1960 — 60 years ago

HISTORY 1960 buy this house for like $8K HRN.jpg

For sale: This four bedroom, two bath house on Cascade Avenue, listed by Butler & Hershner Agency, for $8,900. The home includes river and Mount Adams views. — Nov. 10, 1960, Hood River News

 

Cascade Locks voters selected John M. Carlson, young executive at the local lumber mill, as their next mayor, in heavy voting there Tuesday. Locks voters cast 268 votes in city elections named a five-man city council to work with Carlson. Mr. Carlson will succeed Mayor Lloyd Reinholdt, also an executive at the Cascade Locks Lumber Co. Councilmen elected for two years are Charles W. Miller and Carroll J. Tveidt. Four-year terms rest with Gene McClure, Max Neff and Elmer Parker. — Hood River News

Students who will take the honorary reins of city government and get first-hand experience in other official, civic and business function were named yesterday in connection with Youth Appreciation Week, Nov. 14-20. Honorary mayor from The Dalles High School will be Chet Rettig, with Susie Horn as the counterpart from the Junior High School. — The Dalles Chronicle

 

HISTORY 1960 Orchard Lanes opens HRN.jpg

Grand opening of Orchard Lanes Bowling Alley is advertised in the Nov. 10, 1960, Hood River News.

 

1980 — 40 years ago

 

“Wayne, why can’t you ever win by a landslide?” Many of the election watchers who gathered at Rep. Wayne and Gloria Fawbush’s Dee home Tuesday evening had been through previous campaigns with him. They had seen him make his painful way, vote by crucial vote, from behind in the late-night hours as the last precincts in his district tallied their final votes. But at the unprecedented early hour of 11 p.m., he jubilantly announced that it was all over, he was in for another two years. — Hood River News

“Wayne, why can’t you ever win by a landslide?” Many of the election watchers who gathered at Rep. Wayne and Gloria Fawbush’s Dee home Tuesday evening had been through previous campaigns with him. They had seen him make his painful way, vote by crucial vote, from behind in the late-night hours as the last precincts in his district tallied their final votes. But at the unprecedented early hour of 11 p.m., he jubilantly announced that it was all over, he was in for another two years. — Hood River News

(1979) It was cloudy Friday afternoon while Peter Hackett of White Salmon stood atop the “Old Manner’s Place” barn in Underwood, tearing out nails. The week before, roofing had been removed, and by Friday, beams were being prepared for dismantling. In a month, the landmark barn, which has weathered winter storms and summer gales since the early 1900s, will be no longer. New owner John Olson plans to construct a two-story house on the site, offering a panoramic view of the Columbia River Gorge. “It just breaks my heart,” said Barry Ternahan Monday afternoon. Ternahan lived on the property as a youth when it was owned by his father, Lyle W. Ternahan, who used the barn for raising turkeys for 30 years. The barn has also been used for housing cattle and storing hay. “It’s kind of a landmark,” continued Ternahan. “Dad put an aluminum roof on it about 15 years ago, and on sunny days, you could see it clear from Mosier.” — White Salmon Enterprise

Hints of what to expect in the future for traffic regulation surfaced at the city council meeting Monday night, and they include a one-way grid including First, Second Third and Fourth streets. — The Dalles Chronicle

  

2000 — 20 years ago

 

Three years of active planning came to fruition Tuesday when Hood River County residents gave the nod to a $3 million bond measurer to expand and renovate the public library. Fifty-three percent of the 8,676 participating voters approved the 15-year funding proposal that will be sued to expand the landmark structure on State Street in downtown Hood River. “I think what impressed me the most is that there is a real cross-section of people, old and young, using the library and the ballot box just bore that support out,” said Virginia Hosford, a member of the library’s board of directors. — Hood River News

The Klickitat County Solid Waster Department plans to locate a recycling station adjacent to the wastewater plant on Marina Road near Bingen Point. “This idea just came up out of the blue. I thought it’s a good idea if it doesn’t cause any problems with trash or anything else,” said Bingen Mayor Brian Prigel. Rabanco and Klickitat County are sponsors of the project. Recycling coordinator for Klickitat County Solid Waste Department called it “a test.” “A lot of people have called, and want to get easier access to drop off recycling. This will give people an easier way to get rid of glass, paper and plastic.” — White Salmon Enterprise

For years, Hattenhauer Distributing Co. trucks took a shortcut across the downtown grain elevator property to avoid driving through town. Now, with the grain elevator gone, and a possible future park area planned there, Hattenhauer is pushing for some sort of permanent road through the property. — The Dalles Chronicle

 

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