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Reminder: Ballots mailed Oct. 14 for the Nov. 3 General Election. Contact county elections office if you do not receive it by Oct. 20.

Chris Corry (Incumbent)

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Chris Corry

 

My wife and I live in Yakima with our three kids (9, 7, and 3). Community involvement is important to us and we are also licensed foster parents. When I’m not working in the Legislature, I am a commercial insurance broker. For fun, I enjoy quiet/loud time with my family. 

 

How does your previous experience help qualify you for this Legislative role?

I am currently in my first term as a Legislator. During this term, I advocated for a variety of issues important to my constituents, from helping farmers and ranchers with land/financial protection, to supporting first responders with PTSD resources, to advocating for parental rights in our education system. 

 

Tell us why you are running for this office and list your top three concerns.

I am running because I believe good policy is good for people. Working towards great policy is what our businesses and families deserve and need. 

My top concerns:

Supporting agriculture and ensuring that our farmers and ranchers are protected and valued as they play such a critical role in the health of our land, community, and economy.

Safeguarding parental rights, maintaining local control for the public education system, and improving access to quality education through charter schools and vouchers. 

Making sure that our businesses can operate without cumbersome or outdated regulations and creating a business-friendly state that grows our economy. 

 

What role do you believe the Washington State Legislature has in responding to concerns over the climate crisis?

We have a very important role in the protecting our environment. We all want clean air and water, and a healthy environment to enjoy and pass on to our children. We need free market solutions that both lower our carbon footprint and protect our economy. The future is fossil fuel free, but that takes time and we need to be intentional with our improvements such as looking at renewable resources, including dams. We need to practice better forest health. I support forest thinning, cleaning, and sustainable logging to reduce the out-of-control forest fires that are creating immense carbon damage.

 

Please describe a specific piece of legislation you would sponsor or support in the next session. 

I have a bill ready that will provide compensation to farmers and ranchers who have lease land contracts terminated early by Department of Natural Resources. 

 

 Give one specific suggestion you have for helping small businesses and their employees recover from the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

We need to allocate funds from the CARES Act to small businesses that were forced to temporarily close (many are still closed). We need to provide relief from unemployment rate hikes on our small businesses resulting from these closures. Otherwise, more small businesses will be forced to shut down permanently.

 

Do you support the Port of Hood River’s efforts to replace the Hood River-White Salmon Interstate Bridge? Why or why not?

Yes, the future economic growth in the Gorge will be directly impacted, and I support a new bridge.

 

Tracy Rushing, MD

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Tracy Rushing

 

Originally from Virginia, my family and I have lived in the Columbia Gorge since 2012. I am a mom to three young kids and live on a small family farm. I am an ER doctor locally and am grateful for the opportunity to care for my neighbors. 

 

 How does your previous experience help qualify you for this Legislative role? 

 My work as an ER physician has prepared me well for the role of calming crisis manager who can make and articulate data-driven decisions. My pediatrics training has informed my understanding of the areas that impact the health of families and communities, such as climate, poverty, mental health, and education. 

 

Tell us why you are running for this office and list your top three concerns.

I am a mom and an ER physician with no prior political aspirations. When I witnessed my opponent file a lawsuit against public health measures, I knew he was putting our lives and jobs at risk. We’ve tried to teach our kids that when something is broken, we should try to fix it. I decided I needed to model that. In addition to showing us the risks of inaction, the pandemic also showed us how intertwined the issues of healthcare, the local economy, and the environment are for our community. These are not either/or options, they are both/and.

 

 What role do you believe the Washington State Legislature has in responding to concerns over the climate crisis? 

 To me, the climate crisis is a macrocosm of the coronavirus pandemic. The experts have been warning us that the cost-effective time to make the necessary changes to save lives and avoid major economic destruction is now. 

 Statewide, we’ve often been a leader on climate action and can be proud of this record. We have an ongoing role in continuing to push for change but also in being part of interstate and international collaboration that is necessary to preserve our land, our businesses and our health.

 

 Please describe a specific piece of legislation you would sponsor or support in the next session.  

 The Washington Voting Rights Act helps remedy unfair election systems. I plan to further this as well as push towards a fair redistricting process.

 

Give one specific suggestion you have for helping small businesses and their employees recover from the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. 

 The most important thing we can do to help small businesses and their employees is to take the pandemic seriously. Keeping community transmission levels low not only allow us to further open, but for consumers to have the confidence that economic activities are safe.

 

 Do you support the Port of Hood River’s efforts to replace the Hood River-White Salmon Interstate Bridge? Why or why not? 

 Yes. The current bridge is expensive to upkeep and inadequate. A new bridge can be safe, biking/walking friendly and good for local economy.

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