Doughnut Theory

Kyle Diesner will give an online overview of the book “Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist” by Kate Raworth (2017) on Sept. 28 at 6:30 pm.

Stevenson Grange No. 121s Community Resiliency programs’ central theme for 2021 is “Community Connections.”

In keeping with that theme, Kyle Diesner will give an online overview of the book “Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist” by Kate Raworth (2017) on Sept. 28 at 6:30 pm.

Pre-registration is required on the Events page at fvrl.librarymarket.com/critical-issues-overview-doughnut-economic-theory. Once registered, attendees will get a direct email link to the discussion.

All Grange programs are free and open to the public.

•••

“At its most basic, doughnut economics is a way of describing an economic system that extends beyond strictly financial measures, like gross domestic product, to include environmental sustainability and healthy, thriving communities,” said a grange press release. “The visualization of the doughnut theory is two concentric rings, the outer symbolizing the worlds’ ecological ceiling (beyond which lies environmental destruction and climate change), and the inner symbolizing the social foundation (inside which is homelessness, hunger, and poverty).

“The space between the two rings — the ‘substance’ of the doughnut — is the ‘safe and just place for humanity.'” (See Yes! Magazine, Spring 2021, “Three Cities Switching to Life-Affirming Economies.”)

As the Climate Action Program coordinator at the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Diesner is an experienced policy analyst and a lead author for Portland’s 2015 Climate Action Plan, said the press release. Diesner oversees Portland’s community-wide city operations, and consumption-based emission inventories. Currently, Diesner is working on the city’s Sustainable Consumption Strategy, which seeks to understand the role of governments in reducing global emissions produced when local consumers purchase goods and materials made in other parts of the world.

He has a bachelor’s of science in environmental science from Humboldt State University and an executive master of public administration from Portland State University.

Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability has used the Doughnut Economics framework on various projects, but it has not been used more broadly at the City of Portland, said the press release.

All Community Resiliency Program are co-sponsored by the Stevenson Community Library and Stevenson Grange No. 121. Call Mary Repar, grange master, at 360- 726-7052 or email repar@saw.net for more information.

The Stevenson Library can be reached at 360-906-4828.